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How to install Odoo 10 (ex OpenERP and CRM) on Ubuntu 16.04 with Apache as a reverse proxy within 20...

Posted on: Wed, 2017-08-09 - 15:18 By: danie

How to install Odoo 10 (ex OpenERP and CRM) on Ubuntu 16.04 with Apache as a reverse proxy within 20 mins

Odoo is a web-based open source business software including a number of business applications for Sales, Project and Warehouse Management, CRM, Accounting, Website/eCommerce, Billing, Inventory and thousands of more additional modules developed by the community.

In this guide, we will walk you through a complete Odoo 10 installation on your Ubuntu 16.04 VPS and show you how to configure Apache as a reverse proxy for your Odoo 10.

If you follow these instructions properly it should take no longer than 20 minutes to set up an Odoo on your VPS. A virtual private server is a great way to fully test out this software. More about Odoo itself at https://www.odoo.com/.

See the guide at https://www.rosehosting.com/blog/how-to-install-odoo-10-on-ubuntu-16-04-with-apache-as-a-reverse-proxy/
 

How to install Odoo 10 on Ubuntu 16.04 with Apache as a reverse proxy
Odoo is a web-based open source business software including a number of business applications for Sales, Project and Warehouse Management, CRM, Accounting, Website/eCommerce, Billing, Inventory and thousands of more additional modules developed by the community. In this guide, we will walk you through a complete Odoo 10 installation on your Ubuntu 16.04 VPS and show you how to configure Apache as a reverse proxy for your Odoo 10. If you follow th...

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The Guy Who Invented Those Annoying Password Rules Now Regrets Wasting Your Time

Posted on: Wed, 2017-08-09 - 14:17 By: danie

The Guy Who Invented Those Annoying Password Rules Now Regrets Wasting Your Time

We’ve all been forced to do it: create a password with at least so many characters, so many numbers, so many special characters, and maybe an uppercase letter. Guess what? The guy who invented these standards nearly 15 years ago now admits that they’re basically useless. He is also very sorry.

The man in question is Bill Burr, a former manager at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In 2003, Burr drafted an eight-page guide on how to create secure passwords creatively called the “NIST Special Publication 800-63. Appendix A.” This became the document that would go on to more or less dictate password requirements on everything from email accounts to login pages to your online banking portal. All those rules about using uppercase letters and special characters and numbers—those are all because of Bill.

Simple math shows that a shorter password with wacky characters is much easier to crack than a long string of easy-to-remember words. This classic XKCD comic shows how four simple words create a passphrase that would take a computer 550 years to guess, while a nonsensical string of random characters would take approximately three days.

It's about the length and not the type of characters per se (yes a bigger source of characters is a bit more difficult, but the clincher is actually the length). Something not mentioned is this "need" to change a password every 30 days. Why would you do that if you could rather choose one good long password. The downside of the 30 day rule is users either then write the password down or they choose to just change one character....

See http://gizmodo.com/the-guy-who-invented-those-annoying-password-rules-now-1797643987
 

The Guy Who Invented Those Annoying Password Rules Now Regrets Wasting Your Time
We’ve all been forced to do it: create a password with at least so many characters, so many numbers, so many special characters, and maybe an uppercase letter. Guess what? The guy who invented these standards nearly 15 years ago now admits that they’re basically useless. He is also very sorry.

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Dumping Windows and installing Linux Mint, in just 10 minutes

Posted on: Wed, 2017-08-09 - 13:15 By: danie

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Dumping Windows and installing Linux Mint, in just 10 minutes

Interesting blow-by-blow account of one man's 10 min journey to install Linux Mint on his netbook. You can see exactly what is involved at http://www.zdnet.com/article/dumping-windows-and-installing-linux-mint-in-just-10-minutes/.

I had a similar experience a few years back with my Samsung netbook when I could not find all the Windows XP drivers for the camera and Ethernet adaptor, so I installed Ubuntu instead. Everything just worked out of the box and I was pretty impressed. I still use that netbook nearly 10 years later.

Dumping Windows and installing Linux Mint, in just 10 minutes | ZDNet
One of my netbooks needed refreshing, and I decided to dump Windows completely and install only Linux Mint. The entire process took 10 minutes. Here are the details.

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Sweden scrambles to tighten data security as scandal claims two ministers

Posted on: Tue, 2017-08-08 - 22:41 By: danie

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Sweden scrambles to tighten data security as scandal claims two ministers

Sweden’s government has sought urgent assurances on data security from national agencies including the health, education and pensions services after a huge leak of private and sensitive information that has cost two ministers their jobs.

Amid reports by the Dagens Nyheter newspaper that confidential medical details were being handled by unscreened IT workers in Romania, the national broadcaster SVT said data outsourcing arrangements at six state agencies were being checked.

One transport agency official told police the data that IT workers in the Czech Republic, Serbia and Romania were processing without security clearance under the agreement was equivalent to “the keys to the kingdom”, Dagens Nyheter said.

Swedish IT experts told SVT the incident showed the government’s ignorance of how state agencies handle confidential and sensitive information. “This really shows their low level of expertise on how IT security is handled by the authorities,” said one consultant, Lars Mårelius.

See https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/aug/01/sweden-scrambles-to-tighten-data-security-as-scandal-claims-two-ministers

Sweden scrambles to tighten data security as scandal claims two ministers | World news | The Guardian

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Replacement battery for my Google Nexus 6P phone arrived today, along with tools to do the job

Posted on: Tue, 2017-08-08 - 21:38 By: danie

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Replacement battery for my Google Nexus 6P phone arrived today, along with tools to do the job

My phone also picked up the dreaded battery problem a few months back (it basically dies when the battery reaches 25%). As the battery is not normally replaceable, and an assortment of tools is required to do the job. So it all arrived today and I need to schedule the courage now to get it done. It will either be all better.... or all worse...

The battery is not available locally and neither were many of the tools... the price of buying imported phones without replaceable batteries.... but the freedom makes it worthwhile!

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Android 8.0’s “streaming OS updates” will work even if your phone is full

Posted on: Mon, 2017-08-07 - 22:45 By: danie

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Android 8.0’s “streaming OS updates” will work even if your phone is full

We've probably all had this happen at one point or another: it's time for an OS update, and your phone wants to download a ~1GB brick of an update file. On Android, normally this gets downloaded to the user storage partition and flashed to the system partition. But wait—if your phone is full of pictures, or videos, or apps, there may not be enough space to store the update file. In such circumstances, the update fails, and the user is told to "free up some space." According to the latest source.android.com documentation, Google has cooked up a scheme to make sure that an "insufficient space" error will never stop an update again.

Where the heck can Google store the update if your phone is full, though? If you remember in Android 7.0, Google introduced a new feature called "Seamless Updates." This setup introduced a dual system partition scheme—a "System A" and "System B" partition. The idea is that, when it comes time to install an update, you can normally use your phone on the online "System A" partition while an update is being applied to the offline "System B" partition in the background. Rather than the many minutes of downtime that would normally occur from an update, all that was needed to apply the update was a quick reboot. At that point, the device would just switch from partition A to the newly updated partition B.

Even better news is that it looks like this will be coming to Google Play Services too!

See https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/08/android-8-0s-streaming-os-updates-will-work-even-if-your-phone-is-full/

Android 8.0’s “streaming OS updates” will work even if your phone is full
Android's new OS update scheme should banish the "insufficient space" error forever.

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How to get a Bitcoin or Ethereum debit card in South Africa

Posted on: Mon, 2017-08-07 - 21:43 By: danie

How to get a Bitcoin or Ethereum debit card in South Africa

A number of South African online stores accept payment in Bitcoin, but most brick-and-mortar retailers only accept cash or card.

Cryptocurrency holders looking to spend their digital tokens without converting them to fiat currency, however, can do so with a debit card linked to a virtual wallet.

Cryptopay is an online Bitcoin wallet which allows users to purchase and transfer Bitcoin. The company also offers a VISA debit card, which can be loaded with Bitcoin and used to purchase items or draw fiat currency from ATMs.

The card can reflect either GBP, EUR, or USD amounts, and can be funded by Bitcoin transactions.

Users can order the Cryptopay Bitcoin debit card online through the official website for $15, and the company offers free delivery worldwide. The physical card also has a monthly service fee of $1.00 and a 1% loading fee.

The card can be used without submitting any identity verification documents beyond your billing address, although you will need to verify your identity to remove the transaction and withdrawal limits.

The Cryptopay card can take up to six weeks to arrive in SA, and can be used at any VISA-compatible points of sale.

See https://mybroadband.co.za/news/cryptocurrency/220264-how-to-get-a-bitcoin-or-ethereum-debit-card-in-south-africa.html

 

How to get a Bitcoin or Ethereum debit card in South Africa
Ordering a cryptocurrency debit card allows you to spend your Bitcoin or Ethereum in South Africa.

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What You Can and Can't Recycle

Posted on: Mon, 2017-08-07 - 21:33 By: danie

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What You Can and Can't Recycle

Can you recycle plastic bags? Do you have to scrub out your containers? What about paper towels?

Every major curbside recycling program takes clean paper and cardboard, metal cans, and plastic jugs and bottles. Beyond that, things get complicated. But some general rules apply. Recycling incorrect items (eg. soft plastic bags) can actually cause more expense and waste. And local rules are also important like some recycling depots only take whole glass bottles and not broken glass.

See http://lifehacker.com/what-you-can-and-cant-recycle-1797603814

What You Can and Can't Recycle
We recently got new recycling bins at the Lifehacker office, and suddenly realized no one knew all the rules about recycling. Can you recycle plastic bags? Do you have to scrub out your containers? What about paper towels?

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Using Plotagraph on Mac, Windows and iOS to create animated photos

Posted on: Mon, 2017-08-07 - 05:33 By: danie

Think of those moving Harry Potter photos… It’s also a new word, so you’re super-excused for not knowing it! It simply means a “looping” photograph. You begin with a SINGLE image (not a movie file), like a JPG, and then you use Plotagraph to “animate” it. The resulting image is a repeating movie file that loops so smoothly, you can’t tell the seam. There’s also some crazy new tech on there, like morphing and more.

See some examples and how it is done at https://www.stuckincustoms.com/plotagraph-review/

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