Moka Pot Vs Aeropress - Which Coffee Is Best

Date Published: Fri, 1 Sep 2017 09:42:16 +0200

[ad_1]

Moka Pot Vs Aeropress - Which Coffee Is Best

I recently bought a Bialetti Venus Moka Pot (a non-aluminium stainless steel version that can work on an induction plate) and was eager to compare it to the Aeropress I usually used. Both use light pressure but the inner workings are different.

For me, the AeroPress still makes a stronger richer coffee (I freshly grind a 50/50 mix of French Roast and Hazelnut coffee beans). What I don't get with any of these comparison articles, is they complain about the AeroPress not letting all the oils etc through because of the paper filter. I've long since been using the permanent stainless steel filter that you can get for the AeroPress which sorts this out (and you never run out of paper filters that have to be bought).

The method I use for my AeroPress is the upside-down method where I first stir the coffee in the hot water for about 40 to 60 secs or so, then I invert the AeroPress and apply pressure for about 30 to 40 secs pushing the water through the coffee and the filter.

I get it that everyone's coffee preferences (strength, taste, aroma, speed, mess, etc) are different. So this may not be everyone's "cup of tea".

So why did I buy a Moka pot? Well it was a recommended method for being a healthy way to extract more of the antioxidants etc from coffee (because many stated the paper filter in the AeroPress filtered out some of the goodness). I just hope reviewers in future remember there is a stainless filter for the AeroPress!

See http://www.stovpreso.com/2014/04/moka-pot-vs-aeropress-coffee.html

Moka Pot Vs Aeropress - Which Coffee Is Best
For nearly a full year I've been drinking stovetop moka made from my Bialetti Moka Express. It was purchased on a whim back in June of last ...

[ad_2]

Source link

Moka Pot Vs Aeropress - Which Coffee Is Best

Date Published: Fri, 1 Sep 2017 09:42:16 +0200

[ad_1]

Moka Pot Vs Aeropress - Which Coffee Is Best

I recently bought a Bialetti Venus Moka Pot (a non-aluminium stainless steel version that can work on an induction plate) and was eager to compare it to the Aeropress I usually used. Both use light pressure but the inner workings are different.

For me, the AeroPress still makes a stronger richer coffee (I freshly grind a 50/50 mix of French Roast and Hazelnut coffee beans). What I don't get with any of these comparison articles, is they complain about the AeroPress not letting all the oils etc through because of the paper filter. I've long since been using the permanent stainless steel filter that you can get for the AeroPress which sorts this out (and you never run out of paper filters that have to be bought).

The method I use for my AeroPress is the upside-down method where I first stir the coffee in the hot water for about 40 to 60 secs or so, then I invert the AeroPress and apply pressure for about 30 to 40 secs pushing the water through the coffee and the filter.

I get it that everyone's coffee preferences (strength, taste, aroma, speed, mess, etc) are different. So this may not be everyone's "cup of tea".

So why did I buy a Moka pot? Well it was a recommended method for being a healthy way to extract more of the antioxidants etc from coffee (because many stated the paper filter in the AeroPress filtered out some of the goodness). I just hope reviewers in future remember there is a stainless filter for the AeroPress!

See http://www.stovpreso.com/2014/04/moka-pot-vs-aeropress-coffee.html

Moka Pot Vs Aeropress - Which Coffee Is Best
For nearly a full year I've been drinking stovetop moka made from my Bialetti Moka Express. It was purchased on a whim back in June of last ...

[ad_2]

Source link

Renault installs electric car charging stations powered by used EV battery packs

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 18:43:13 +0200

[ad_1]

Renault installs electric car charging stations powered by used EV battery packs

It was always said that EV batteries can be repurposed as static storage after they have served their time in cars.

See https://electrek.co/2017/08/29/renault-electric-car-charging-stations-used-ev-battery-packs/

Renault installs electric car charging stations powered by used EV battery packs
Renault technically owns a lot of electric car battery packs thanks to its Zoe program under which they sell the actual car, but they lease the battery pack for a monthly fee. Now they are using so…

[ad_2]

Source link

Renault installs electric car charging stations powered by used EV battery packs

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 18:43:13 +0200

[ad_1]

Renault installs electric car charging stations powered by used EV battery packs

It was always said that EV batteries can be repurposed as static storage after they have served their time in cars.

See https://electrek.co/2017/08/29/renault-electric-car-charging-stations-used-ev-battery-packs/

Renault installs electric car charging stations powered by used EV battery packs
Renault technically owns a lot of electric car battery packs thanks to its Zoe program under which they sell the actual car, but they lease the battery pack for a monthly fee. Now they are using so…

[ad_2]

Source link

Open Access in higher education in South Africa

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 14:31:45 +0200

Open Access in higher education in South Africa

Misconceptions about what Open Access (OA) really means may have contributed to the slow uptake and support thereof, worldwide. Through the years academics have published articles with leading commercial enterprises and invariably signed away their copyright to publishers. Many African researchers can still not afford the fees to have their research published and have to pay to get access to citations. All of this results in a slow, closed, and costly process.

In 2014, Czerniewicz and Goodier, in the South African Journal of Science, wrote that true OA is not only based on legally open licences whereby an author actually retains copyright and specifies the permitted uses, but it is also more aligned with academic freedom than traditional copyright agreements. OA applies to all forms of online published research output, including peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed academic journal articles, theses and book chapters. The important factor is that researchers can now harvest information efficiently and poorer countries are enabled with restriction-free access to a rich collection of citations.

According to the Global Open Access Portal, the OA movement in Africa has recently gained momentum. In 2015, the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) issued a statement that encouraged higher education institutions to formulate policies on providing OA to research publications funded by the NRF. In the same year, OA policies from Kenya, Zimbabwe, Algeria, South Africa, Ghana and Nigeria were registered in the Registry of Open Access Repository Policies and Mandates (ROARMAP), and more than 125 OA digital repositories were registered in the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR at http://opendoar.org/). OpenDOAR is an authoritative directory of academic open access repositories. Each OpenDOAR repository has been visited by project staff to check the information that is recorded here. This in-depth approach does not rely on automated analysis and gives a quality-controlled list of repositories.

See https://www.opencollab.co.za/open-access-in-higher-education-in-south-africa/
 

Open Access in higher education in South Africa - OpenCollab
“Knowledge does not impact on society if it is unable to disseminate” - Merton Misconceptions about what Open Access (OA) really means may have contribu

Source link

Tags: Education

Open Access in higher education in South Africa

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 14:31:45 +0200

Open Access in higher education in South Africa

Misconceptions about what Open Access (OA) really means may have contributed to the slow uptake and support thereof, worldwide. Through the years academics have published articles with leading commercial enterprises and invariably signed away their copyright to publishers. Many African researchers can still not afford the fees to have their research published and have to pay to get access to citations. All of this results in a slow, closed, and costly process.

In 2014, Czerniewicz and Goodier, in the South African Journal of Science, wrote that true OA is not only based on legally open licences whereby an author actually retains copyright and specifies the permitted uses, but it is also more aligned with academic freedom than traditional copyright agreements. OA applies to all forms of online published research output, including peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed academic journal articles, theses and book chapters. The important factor is that researchers can now harvest information efficiently and poorer countries are enabled with restriction-free access to a rich collection of citations.

According to the Global Open Access Portal, the OA movement in Africa has recently gained momentum. In 2015, the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) issued a statement that encouraged higher education institutions to formulate policies on providing OA to research publications funded by the NRF. In the same year, OA policies from Kenya, Zimbabwe, Algeria, South Africa, Ghana and Nigeria were registered in the Registry of Open Access Repository Policies and Mandates (ROARMAP), and more than 125 OA digital repositories were registered in the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR at http://opendoar.org/). OpenDOAR is an authoritative directory of academic open access repositories. Each OpenDOAR repository has been visited by project staff to check the information that is recorded here. This in-depth approach does not rely on automated analysis and gives a quality-controlled list of repositories.

See https://www.opencollab.co.za/open-access-in-higher-education-in-south-africa/
 

Open Access in higher education in South Africa - OpenCollab
“Knowledge does not impact on society if it is unable to disseminate” - Merton Misconceptions about what Open Access (OA) really means may have contribu

Source link

Tags: Education

Open Access in higher education in South Africa

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 14:31:45 +0200

Open Access in higher education in South Africa

Misconceptions about what Open Access (OA) really means may have contributed to the slow uptake and support thereof, worldwide. Through the years academics have published articles with leading commercial enterprises and invariably signed away their copyright to publishers. Many African researchers can still not afford the fees to have their research published and have to pay to get access to citations. All of this results in a slow, closed, and costly process.

In 2014, Czerniewicz and Goodier, in the South African Journal of Science, wrote that true OA is not only based on legally open licences whereby an author actually retains copyright and specifies the permitted uses, but it is also more aligned with academic freedom than traditional copyright agreements. OA applies to all forms of online published research output, including peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed academic journal articles, theses and book chapters. The important factor is that researchers can now harvest information efficiently and poorer countries are enabled with restriction-free access to a rich collection of citations.

According to the Global Open Access Portal, the OA movement in Africa has recently gained momentum. In 2015, the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) issued a statement that encouraged higher education institutions to formulate policies on providing OA to research publications funded by the NRF. In the same year, OA policies from Kenya, Zimbabwe, Algeria, South Africa, Ghana and Nigeria were registered in the Registry of Open Access Repository Policies and Mandates (ROARMAP), and more than 125 OA digital repositories were registered in the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR at http://opendoar.org/). OpenDOAR is an authoritative directory of academic open access repositories. Each OpenDOAR repository has been visited by project staff to check the information that is recorded here. This in-depth approach does not rely on automated analysis and gives a quality-controlled list of repositories.

See https://www.opencollab.co.za/open-access-in-higher-education-in-south-africa/
 

Open Access in higher education in South Africa - OpenCollab
“Knowledge does not impact on society if it is unable to disseminate” - Merton Misconceptions about what Open Access (OA) really means may have contribu

Source link

Tags: Education

Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 13:24:37 +0200

[ad_1]

Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health

A large, 18-country study may turn current nutritional thinking on its head.

The new research suggests that it's not the fat in your diet that's raising your risk of premature death, it's too many carbohydrates -- especially the refined, processed kinds of carbs -- that may be the real killer.

The research also found that eating fruits, vegetables and legumes can lower your risk of dying prematurely. But three or four servings a day seemed to be plenty. Any additional servings didn't appear to provide more benefit.

People with a high fat intake -- about 35 percent of their daily diet -- had a 23 percent lower risk of early death and 18 percent lower risk of stroke compared to people who ate less fat, said lead author Mahshid Dehghan. She's an investigator with the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University in Ontario.

The researchers also noted that a very low intake of saturated fats (below 3 percent of daily diet) was associated with a higher risk of death in the study, compared to diets containing up to 13 percent daily.

At the same time, high-carb diets -- containing an average 77 percent carbohydrates -- were associated with a 28 percent increased risk of death versus low-carb diets, Dehghan said.

"The study showed that contrary to popular belief, increased consumption of dietary fats is associated with a lower risk of death," Dehghan said.

My note: But don't expect any fireworks or sudden changes from government nutrition advisers. They'll likely only very slowly retune their drum that they bang on about everything in moderation, carefully balanced diet, etc. The ironic thing is that many citizens made up their own minds and have made their own chnages to their diets.

See https://www.cbsnews.com/news/large-study-suggests-carbs-not-fats-bad-for-you/

Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health
New research may turn conventional thinking on its head, but some experts warn its not time to change nutritional guidelines just yet

[ad_2]

Source link

Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 13:24:37 +0200

[ad_1]

Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health

A large, 18-country study may turn current nutritional thinking on its head.

The new research suggests that it's not the fat in your diet that's raising your risk of premature death, it's too many carbohydrates -- especially the refined, processed kinds of carbs -- that may be the real killer.

The research also found that eating fruits, vegetables and legumes can lower your risk of dying prematurely. But three or four servings a day seemed to be plenty. Any additional servings didn't appear to provide more benefit.

People with a high fat intake -- about 35 percent of their daily diet -- had a 23 percent lower risk of early death and 18 percent lower risk of stroke compared to people who ate less fat, said lead author Mahshid Dehghan. She's an investigator with the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University in Ontario.

The researchers also noted that a very low intake of saturated fats (below 3 percent of daily diet) was associated with a higher risk of death in the study, compared to diets containing up to 13 percent daily.

At the same time, high-carb diets -- containing an average 77 percent carbohydrates -- were associated with a 28 percent increased risk of death versus low-carb diets, Dehghan said.

"The study showed that contrary to popular belief, increased consumption of dietary fats is associated with a lower risk of death," Dehghan said.

My note: But don't expect any fireworks or sudden changes from government nutrition advisers. They'll likely only very slowly retune their drum that they bang on about everything in moderation, carefully balanced diet, etc. The ironic thing is that many citizens made up their own minds and have made their own chnages to their diets.

See https://www.cbsnews.com/news/large-study-suggests-carbs-not-fats-bad-for-you/

Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health
New research may turn conventional thinking on its head, but some experts warn its not time to change nutritional guidelines just yet

[ad_2]

Source link

Choosing a 360° Camera... But be Cautious

Date Published: Thu, 31 Aug 2017 11:11:24 +0200

[ad_1]

Choosing a 360° Camera... But be Cautious

I do think that any 360 camera (or attachment) is a lot easier than spending a whole minute or two rotating around trying to capture a 360 pano view. There are even 360° camera attachments now for Android phones.

But that said before buying you need to consider:
* Watch real video reviews or real-life examples posted of the photos.
* The manual approach is often a higher resolution and eliminates yourself and your feet
* Twin fisheye lenses are going to show a lack of detail at the edges
* Don't compare to normal photo megapixel values as the fisheye lenses need to capture and compress more so the megapixel value should be a bit higher
* Holding these cameras up (without a selfie stick) can have a serious amount of finger obscuring the picture
* But they are super quick and convenient
* Video stabilisation is not offered for example on YouTube for these videos
* Consider the shape / bulk if you want to carry it in your pocket

See http://www.threesixtycameras.com/best-360-camera-2017-buying-guide/

The Best 360 Cameras of 2017 - Ultimate 360 Camera Buying Guide
Find the best 360 cameras of 2017 with my ultimate guide! I've used over a dozen 360 cameras in the past year and know exactly which ones are the best.

[ad_2]

Source link

Subscribe to GadgeteerZA Blog Posts