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Apple's Legendary Lisa Operating System Is Coming to Your Desktop for Free

Posted on: Thu, 2017-12-28 - 15:48 By: admin

Apple's Legendary Lisa Operating System Is Coming to Your Desktop for Free

Apple’s Lisa project might be the most loaded chapter in the company’s lore, and thanks to the Computer History Museum, you’ll soon be able to play around with one of the first graphical user interfaces in history right there on your shiny state of the art screen. And you won’t have to pay $10,000 that the original Lisa computer cost in 1983.

Al Kossow, a Software Curator at the museum, recently announced that source code for Lisa’s operating system and applications has been recovered and a conversion of the code is currently under review by Apple. He wrote that after the review is done, the museum will release a text on the significance of the Lisa project and make the code available for all in 2018.

In an incident that would kick off a feud between Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, the Apple team visited the Xerox PARC lab to check out its work on graphical interfaces. As the story goes, Xerox had essentially figured out the key to the modern PC but sat on the technology. Apple was riding high on the success of the Apple II and Jobs offered Xerox the option to buy 100,000 shares in his company at the pre-IPO price of $10 apiece in exchange for allowing his engineers to play around with Xerox’s tech for three days. The engineers took what they learned from Xerox and created the Lisa.

See https://gizmodo.com/apples-legendary-lisa-operating-system-is-coming-to-you-1821606783

 

 

Apple's Legendary Lisa Operating System Is Coming to Your Desktop for Free
Apple’s Lisa project might be the most loaded chapter in the company’s lore, and thanks to the Computer History Museum, you’ll soon be able to play around with one of the first graphical user interfaces in history right there on your shiny state of the art screen. And you won’t have to pay $10,000 that the original Lisa computer cost in 1983.

 

 

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UptimeRobot - Free dashboard uptime monitoring for any websites

Posted on: Wed, 2017-12-27 - 11:16 By: admin

UptimeRobot - Free dashboard uptime monitoring for any websites

This can be useful if you have one or more hosting providers and need to keep stats (or be alerted) when the sites are unavailable. The service is free for up to 50 sites and a min of 5 mins periods (more than that you can upgrade to Pro with a comparison at https://uptimerobot.com/pricing), you can set an RSS feed, get e-mail alerts, have a custom public uptime page (like mine at https://status.gadgeteer.co.za/). The free account probably has more than enough for most people.

See http://bit.ly/2BHkhSP


How to play music on Google Home without a Google Music subscription

Posted on: Wed, 2017-12-27 - 09:00 By: admin

How to play music on Google Home without a Google Music subscription

Obviously Google Home works really well with a paid subscription to Google Music (I've been using the free 3-month subscription that came with mine) but the Mini's did not come with this and many do not have those subscriptions. The linked article will explain what other options you can use and I did find the free Google Music playlist option to work quite well. At the end of the article are also some useful additional info links. IFTTT works really well with Google Home to do some interesting things.

See http://bit.ly/2BCTHKm


How To Fire Up a Steam Locomotive [4K] in just 6 to 7 hours

Posted on: Tue, 2017-12-26 - 18:47 By: admin

How To Fire Up a Steam Locomotive [4K] in just 6 to 7 hours

I love riding on heritage steam railways when I can and always used to think it was an hour or two job to just light the fire and do a few basics. But there is a lot more to it than that as this 37 min video shows.

A step-by-step video, with descriptions, on how to fire up a coal-burning steam locomotive. The entire 6 - 7 hour process was shortened down to ~37 minutes in this video to highlight most of the main points.

The locomotive seen in the video is Denver and Rio Grande Western (D&RGW) mikado (2-8-2) #491, one of the largest narrow gauge locomotives ever created. It now runs at the Colorado Railroad Museum in Golden, Colorado. It has ~37,100 pounds of tractive effort, and weighs ~150 tons or ~302,000 pounds. It was built in 1928 by the D&RGW Burnham shops in Denver, Colorado using the boiler off of a standard gauge D&RGW 2-8-0. #491 is a pristine example of a locomotive perfectly suited for rugged, mountain climbing work.

Watch it at https://youtu.be/xx9Q8PphAVo


Amazon Alexa and Google Home top App Store charts on Christmas Day, implies smart speakers were popular...

Posted on: Tue, 2017-12-26 - 17:49 By: admin

Amazon Alexa and Google Home top App Store charts on Christmas Day, implies smart speakers were popular holiday gifts

The App Store charts always provide some interesting nuggets of information on Christmas Day and other big holidays as you can see the sudden influx of app downloads. This year, the Alexa app for Amazon Echo smart speakers topped App Store free charts, hitting the #1 in a few regions, with Google Home also charting in the top ten. Smart speakers were a hot holiday shopping item this year for sure.

Ahead of the holidays, Amazon updated the original Echo with better sound, introduced a new Echo Spot alarm clock, and heavily marketed the devices on its website with significant discounts. Google launched the Google Home Mini providing its smart speaker ecosystem in a budget $29 offering.

These smart speakers have also been upping their game to become quite useful for nor only answering queries but controlling home devices with ease.

See http://bit.ly/2CaQbuf


Chrome 64 Brings a New Feature to The ‘Flags’ Page – Find Your Changes Easier

Posted on: Tue, 2017-12-26 - 15:40 By: admin

Chrome 64 Brings a New Feature to The ‘Flags’ Page – Find Your Changes Easier

Chrome’s ‘flags page’ has been here for some time, but there’s some great news. It got redesigned recently, making it easier to use. Open Chrome browser and type in the search bar the following link: chrome://flags. It should take you to a hidden page that shows you different features that can be enabled, disabled, or left as default.

The redesign of this page is supposed to let you manually enable or disable flags, and they are now at the top of the page for an easier use. This redesigned page is available in Chrome Beta, Dev, and Canary.

Did you just enable something that might have broken something? Then this new look of the flags page should allow you to find what you enabled, as it will move everything you have changed at the top of the page.

See http://bit.ly/2BB24WL


In Germany, consumers get paid for using power

Posted on: Tue, 2017-12-26 - 14:42 By: admin

In Germany, consumers get paid for using power

Germany has spent $200 billion over the past two decades to promote cleaner sources of electricity. That enormous investment is now having an unexpected impact — consumers are now actually paid to use power on occasion, as was the case over the weekend.

Power prices plunged below zero for much of Sunday and the early hours of Christmas Day on the EPEX Spot, a large European power-trading exchange, the result of low demand, unseasonably warm weather and strong breezes that provided an abundance of wind power on the grid.

Such “negative prices” are not the norm in Germany, but they are far from rare, thanks to the country’s effort to encourage investment in greener forms of power generation. Prices for electricity in Germany have dipped below zero — meaning customers are being paid to consume power — more than 100 times this year alone, according to EPEX Spot.

Battery storage capacity, meanwhile, is not yet advanced enough to take in all of the excess generation. And because older power plants that run on fossil fuels take a long time to ramp up and reduce electricity generation, they are not able to respond decisively enough to the shifting supply.

Power producers are learning to adapt to this new world. RWE, one of Germany’s largest operators of power installations, takes advantage of negative prices by being paid to pump large volumes of water into a mountain lake in Austria. When prices are higher, the company releases the water, using turbines to generate electricity. “We are able to ramp units down, and switch the pumps on,” said Martin Keiner, RWE’s head of commercial-asset optimization. “You can earn a lot on flexibility.”

See http://bit.ly/2BDW9QS


Google Maps’ Moat - How far ahead of Apple Maps is Google Maps?

Posted on: Mon, 2017-12-25 - 20:37 By: admin

Google Maps’ Moat - How far ahead of Apple Maps is Google Maps?

This cartographer has spent over a year doing a deep analysis of Google Maps detail vs Apple Maps and others and concluded that Google may be "streets" ahead of the others. Essentially Google is not just collecting Street View and Satellite view data but is creating data from data itself using machine learning.

See http://bit.ly/2BygOWh


Make this self-flying camera drone your personal photographer

Posted on: Mon, 2017-12-25 - 16:02 By: admin

Make this self-flying camera drone your personal photographer

The Hover Camera Passport drone, which is on sale for $349.99 a limited time, uses face-detection technology to fly and follow you autonomously while capturing footage of your surroundings. Designed for use virtually anywhere, this 2017 Red Dot Design Award-winner is ultra-portable at just 242 grams and folds easily into a travel-friendly size that fits comfortably in a purse or backpack. Send it on its way and get on with your fun while it records 360-degree videos of your environment.

This device looks likes it hits the spot in terms of portability and practicality. It probably just needs a slightly cheaper price tag although it could also be because it is 4K capture.

See http://on.mash.to/2BzGv90


How to Move a Steam Game to Another Drive, The Easy Way

Posted on: Mon, 2017-12-25 - 02:51 By: admin

How to Move a Steam Game to Another Drive, The Easy Way

Steam offers multiple library folders, and you can choose where you want to install games when you download them. And you can easily move a game after you’ve downloaded it without re-downloading the entire thing.

This process can save you from downloading tens or even hundreds of gigabytes of game data all over again, just because you got a new SSD and want to move a few games. It’s different from moving an entire Steam library folder, which moves every single game inside it — the following process will let you move only a few games rather than the whole library.

I have a small 128GB SSD drive just for booting Windows 10 for the two or three Windows only Steam Games I have that will not run under a VM on Linux. I'm going to try this, and move all my "Windows only" based games to an NTFS partition on a separate drive, and then see if Steam on both Windows installs will see that one "external" libraries folder. This will mean having only two Steam games folders to backup, one Linux folder and one Windows folder. Any re-installs of my OSs will mean not having to restore GBs of Steam game files.

See http://bit.ly/2C2jtLD


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