Many hand sanitisers falsely claim to be SABS-approved – standards are voluntary but SANS 490 and SANS 1853 are desired ones

Date Published: Thu, 9 Jul 2020 22:31:07 +0200

A recent investigation by SciCorp Laboratories revealed that almost half of hand sanitisers do not comply with government regulations that they should contain at least 70% alcohol.

For this investigation, 11 hand sanitisers were tested. All but one of them claimed to contain more than 70% alcohol. The hand sanitisers were tested for ethanol, propanol, and isopropanol, and five of the 11 samples were found to contain less than 70% alcohol.

A TimesLive report by Wendy Knowler revealed that two of the hand sanitisers which claimed to contain 70% and 85% alcohol respectively only contained 46% and 55% alcohol.

Of course claiming to be SABS-approved when a product is not approved, is criminally fraudulent.

See Many hand sanitisers falsely claim to be SABS-approved – Here is the real list

#southafrica #covid19

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An investigation revealed that almost half of hand sanitisers do not comply with government regulations and even falsely claim to be SABS-approved. Here is the list of approved manufacturers and brands in South Africa.

Home router warning: They're riddled with known flaws and run ancient, unpatched Linux because most OEMs do not apply the patches

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 21:31:04 +0200

Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Communication (FKIE) has carried out a study involving 127 home routers from seven brands to check for the presence of known security vulnerabilities in the latest firmware. The results are appalling.

The FKIE study found that 46 routers hadn't got a single security update within the past year and that many routers are affected by hundreds of known vulnerabilities.

FKIE assessed that ASUS and Netgear do a better job on some aspects of securing routers than D-Link, Linksys, TP-Link and Zyxel, but it argues the industry needs to do more to secure home routers. In the worst cases of devices FKIE assessed, the routers hadn't been updated for more than five years.

About 90% of the routers in the study used a Linux operating system. However, manufacturers weren't updating the OS with fixes made available from Linux kernel maintainers.
Glad to say I run an ASUS router and I get updates about every second month and install them.

See Home router warning: They're riddled with known flaws and run ancient, unpatched Linux | ZDNet

#technology #networking

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And there are no routers in the study from the Fraunhofer Institute without known security flaws.

EU Diesel Drivers Burn 100× More Palm Oil Than All Oreo Cookies In World - Ban diesel, not cookies if you want to make a real difference

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 20:22:53 +0200

Junk food is well known for containing a lot of palm oil. If you’re concerned about deforestation from palm oil (a huge issue for our atmosphere as well as biodiversity), you have probably seen the campaigns urging people to not buy certain brands and urging producers of such food to use something other than palm oil. I don’t recall seeing any campaigns regarding palm oil and diesel, or even big awareness-raising campaigns about the link. Until now.

Transport & Environment (T&E) has release a report that shows that EU drivers burn more palm oil in their diesel fuel in a year than is put in all of the Oreo cookies in the world each year.

This comes in part because palm oil use in “biodiesel” jumped 7% in the EU last year as regulations pushed industry to “clean up” diesel pollution. A record 4.5 million tonnes of palm oil were put into biodiesel in the EU.

That's not to say junk food is good for anyone, but in this case if the environment is a priority, diesel needs to receive attention because it's a major polluter on this planet.

See EU Diesel Drivers Burn 100× More Palm Oil Than All Oreo Cookies In World

#environment #diesel

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Transport & Environment (T&E) has release a report that shows that EU drivers burn more palm oil in their diesel fuel in a year than is put in all of the Oreo cookies in the world each year.

LinkedIn will let you upload audio clips to tell people how to pronounce your name - Users can record 10 seconds of audio to guide pronunciation

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 19:29:51 +0200

The recordings can only be added via LinkedIn’s mobile apps on Android and iOS, but playback is accessible on both mobile and desktop. To add a recording, simply head to your profile on a mobile app, click View Profile, then Edit, and then “Record name pronunciation.”

It’s designed to minimize awkward or unprofessional mistakes when speaking to contacts for the first time: something that’s even more important when the pandemic has meant that face-to-face meetings are limited.

See LinkedIn will let you upload audio clips to tell people how to pronounce your name

#technology #socialnetworks

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Minimize gaffes with pronunciation guides

South Africa's CSIR has developed a locally-produced ventilator in collaboration with a number of South African partners for COVID-19

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 19:02:54 +0200

According to the CSIR, the first batch of ventilators will be provided to state hospitals around the country that are experiencing issues due to the unavailability of equipment to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.

These ventilators are Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) devices that provide a mild level of oxygenated air pressure to keep the airways open and assist with breathing.

They are non-invasive and are able to be deployed and applied easily, making them effective at addressing the shortage of breathing apparatus across the country. These ventilators will be applied within and outside of hospitals for intervention in cases where patients are at an early, not-intensive stage of respiratory distress caused by COVID-19.

This means the CSIR’s ventilators can be used in field hospitals and quarantine facilities as well as normal hospitals.

See South Africa builds its own ventilators to fight COVID-19 – Photos

#technology #southafrica #covid19

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The CSIR has developed a locally-produced ventilator in collaboration with a number of partners, and it is now being rolled out to hospitals nationwide.

Crackdown fears make Signal Mesenger Hong Kong’s most downloaded mobile app - Don't wait until a crackdown happens though to install

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 18:57:02 +0200

There are some great apps like Signal but also peer-to-peer apps like Briar, Manyverse, Jami and others which communicate directly across Bluetooth and/or Wifi without the Internet.

If the Google Play Store is censored or banned for you there are alternatives like F-Droid and other stores to install form. But why wait until there is crackdown - install two or three alternative messenger apps now and be setup. These can also be used for community emergencies during loss of Internet for natural reasons.

See Hong Kong downloads of Signal surge as residents fear crackdown

#technology #Security

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A new security law is expected to undermine Hong Kong’s autonomy and freedoms.

This is another way ham radio operators use technology to assist with search and rescue in wilderness areas

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 14:36:59 +0200

This video shows how APRS trackers are used to show exactly where the rescue teams currently are, and what areas have already been covered. Radio is used for this as the terrain is often in mountainous areas, or wilderness areas, where cellphone reception and even emergency radios cannot reach. Although radios are often used for voice communications, they are also used for transmitting digital information like APRS. This scenario is replicated all over the world by similar organisations.

See How Volunteer Amateur Radio Operators Assist With Search And Rescue Operations Using APRS

#technology #amateurradio

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This video shows how APRS trackers are used to show exactly where the rescue teams currently are, and what areas have already been covered. Radio is used for...

GPS is but one standard, there is also BeiDou-3, Galileo, GLONASS, NAVIC and QZSS

Date Published: Wed, 8 Jul 2020 13:01:34 +0200

A few weeks ago, China launched the final satellite in its BeiDou-3 satellite positioning system. Didn’t know that China had its own GPS? How about Europe’s Galileo, Russia’s GLONASS, or Japan’s QZSS? There’s a whole world of GPS-alikes out there. Let’s take a look.

The Global Positioning System (GPS) that many of us know and use flew its first satellite in the distant past of 1978, just five years after the project began. Becoming fully operational in 1993, it was originally intended for use by the military. After decrees by government and the increase in civilian accuracy in 2000, GPS took the world by storm.
While open access to GPS spawned new industries and made navigation easier for everyone, governments worldwide were keenly aware that such a useful system was under the sole control of the United States. As more came to rely on it for day to day activities, it became clear to many that it would be advantageous to have a system under their own control.

These factors have led to the development of a spate of satellite navigation systems being developed by other nation states. Russia’s GLONASS, the European Union’s Galileo, and China’s BeiDou navigation system all offer comparable functionality to GPS. Meanwhile, Japan and India have both undertaken the construction of regional navigational systems, with QZSS and NAVIC, respectively. Each have their own unique qualities, and it bears learning about the relative systems and what they bring to satellite navigation.

See Not Just GPS: New Options For Global Positioning

#technology #navigation

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A few weeks ago, China launched the final satellite in its BeiDou-3 satellite positioning system. Didn’t know that China had its own GPS? How about Europe’s Galileo, Russia’s GLON…

4 Useful Tools to Run Commands on Multiple Linux Servers - Ever heard of Parallel SSH?

Date Published: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 13:23:33 +0200

In this article, they show how to run commands on multiple Linux servers at the same time. They explain how to use some of the widely known tools designed to execute repetitive series of commands on multiple servers simultaneously. This guide is useful for system administrators who usually have to check the health of multiple Linux servers everyday.

See 4 Useful Tools to Run Commands on Multiple Linux Servers

#technology #opensource #Linux

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In this article, we will explain 4 useful tools to run or execute repetitive series of Linux commands on multiple remote Linux servers simultaneously.

Why it is dangerous (and illegal) to just throw away old batteries and electronics in South Africa

Date Published: Tue, 7 Jul 2020 13:19:19 +0200

South Africans should be careful when disposing of batteries and old electronics. Since the National Environmental Management Act (NEMA) of 2008 classified electronic waste as hazardous, consumers are required to dispose of their electronics in a way that does not harm the environment.

This includes any appliance or gadget that makes use of electricity – including fridges, stoves, kettles, irons, cellphones, batteries, computers, and TVs.
Illegal or inappropriate disposal of these items could have devastating consequences for people and the environment.

The article goes into a lot more detail especially with to the coming year for dry battery disposal.

See Why it is dangerous to just throw away old batteries and electronics in South Africa

#environment #southafrica

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South Africans should be careful when disposing of batteries and old electronics.

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