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Wikipedia has a good comparison of the different Raspberry Pi computers

Date Published: Sat, 9 Mar 2019 21:35:57 +0200

If you are not sure what model of Raspberry Pi to buy this Wikipedia page compares them by price, CPU, ports, RAM, power ratings, etc.

See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberr…

#raspberrypi

 
 

Egg consumption is up as fear of cholesterol recedes

Date Published: Sat, 9 Mar 2019 21:01:43 +0200

Eggs are back on American plates. Although consumption has not rebounded to the egg-rich days of the mid 1940s, when each person averaged 404 eggs per year, the current annual per capita appetite for eggs, forecast at 279 eggs this year, shows a meaningful recovery from the low-point of 229 eggs per person consumed in 1992.

Why are eggs making a comeback? In part, it has to do with the diminishing fear of dietary cholesterol, as scientists and nutrition experts grapple with a fact that has been apparent in the scientific literature for some time: the cholesterol we eat does not have much of an effect on the amount of cholesterol in our blood. In fact, the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans softened the stance on dietary cholesterol, removing it from the list of “nutrients of concern.”

See www.dietdoctor.com/egg-consump…

 
 

Civil servants 'Sir Humphrey' their way through grilling on UK.gov's digital transformation - MPs ask for specifics, get evasive umming and erring

Date Published: Thu, 7 Mar 2019 18:43:58 +0200

The Whitehall officials running departments and agencies at the centre of efforts to boost digitisation, along with their political bosses, were yesterday quizzed by the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee.

The MPs are trying to get to the bottom of the government's progress towards becoming 'truly digital', rather than just sticking a fancy front end on processes that are often manual. They've so far taken evidence from the founders of the Government Digital Service (GDS), industry and various Whitehall tech-watchers.

Among these concerns are that efforts to reduce vendor lock-in and bring IT in-house, kicked off by Francis Maude in 2011, have lost momentum – and that progress in ripping and replacing outdated kit risks grinding to a halt, with some departments falling further behind and GDS being increasingly sidelined.

My comment: Interesting to see politicians getting into the real specifics and holding departments accountable for the efficient (or not) expenditure of taxpayers money.

See www.theregister.co.uk/2019/03/…

#digitalgovernment #UK #government www.theregister.co.uk/2019/03/…

Civil servants 'Sir Humphrey' their way through grilling on UK.gov's digital transformation - MPs ask...

Date Published: Thu, 7 Mar 2019 18:26:09 +0200

Civil servants 'Sir Humphrey' their way through grilling on UK.gov's digital transformation - MPs ask for specifics, get evasive umming and erring

The Whitehall officials running departments and agencies at the centre of efforts to boost digitisation, along with their political bosses, were yesterday quizzed by the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee.

The MPs are trying to get to the bottom of the government's progress towards becoming 'truly digital', rather than just sticking a fancy front end on processes that are often manual. They've so far taken evidence from the founders of the Government Digital Service (GDS), industry and various Whitehall tech-watchers.

Among these concerns are that efforts to reduce vendor lock-in and bring IT in-house, kicked off by Francis Maude in 2011, have lost momentum – and that progress in ripping and replacing outdated kit risks grinding to a halt, with some departments falling further behind and GDS being increasingly sidelined.

My comment: Interesting to see politicians getting into the real specifics and holding departments accountable for the efficient (or not) expenditure of taxpayers money.

See https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/03/05/uk_digital_government_inquiry/

#digitalgovernment #UK #government


Civil servants 'Sir Humphrey' their way through grilling on UK.gov's digital transformation • The Register

Both Huawei Cloud and Microsoft Cloud are now available in South Africa

Date Published: Wed, 6 Mar 2019 22:44:43 +0200

Both Huawei Cloud and Microsoft Cloud are now available in South Africa

Huawei said on Tuesday that its Cloud offering is now available in South Africa. “Like all Huawei Cloud data centres, the South African facility complies with tier 3+ standards and uses Huawei’s high-performance chips and network devices to offer a better user experience,” the Chinese electronics giant said in a statement. Huawei is leasing a data centre in Johannesburg from a partner from where it is deploying localised public cloud services based on local industry policies, customer requirements and partner conditions, it said. Huawei plans to gradually operate more data centres in Kenya, Nigeria and other countries in Africa, it said.

Microsoft has officially launched two Azure cloud data centres in South Africa, one in Cape Town and the other in Johannesburg, after the software giant missed an earlier deadline of December 2018 to take the facilities live. Lillian Barnard, newly appointed MD at Microsoft South Africa, said at a press conference in Johannesburg on Wednesday that the data centre region is live with immediate effect. “The enterprise-grade data centre regions in Cape Town and Johannesburg … will power cloud, artificial intelligence and edge computing innovations across the continent,” Barnard said.

Well East now meets West in Centre...

See https://techcentral.co.za/huawei-cloud-now-available-in-south-africa/87985/ and https://techcentral.co.za/microsoft-cloud-data-centres-now-live-in-south-africa/88003/

#microsoft #huawei #cloud



Huawei Cloud now available in South Africa - TechCentral

The Saints of Silicon at the Centre for Computing History have got hold of the original build of Sinclair's ZX Spectrum - Hopes to bring silicon back to life over next few weeks

Date Published: Wed, 6 Mar 2019 22:35:16 +0200

The hardware had been in the possession of Nine Tiles, a company responsible for the BASIC ROM in the ZX80 and ZX81 and called upon to provide the new BASIC for Sir Clive's new colour computer. Judging by labels on the ROM chips, the computer dates from around July 1981.

The Register had a chat with museum curator and CEO Jason Fitzpatrick, who told them the hardware had been fired up at some point in the past, and that the museum hoped to bring it back to life in the coming weeks, if the silicon cooperates.

And the value? In world where a working Apple 1 board can fetch $350,000, it's difficult to put a price on the one-off. Fitzpatrick remarked "It's in the eye of the beholder."

Yes I behold this computer with awe. The ZX81 (its predecessor) was the second computer I owned and where I really cut my teeth on programming in BASIC and hex. The ZX81's and ZX Spectrums launched many a successful computer career back then by sparking interesting in young minds.

See www.theregister.co.uk/2019/03/… and don't miss the video at the bottom of the article

#zxspectrum #retro #vintage www.theregister.co.uk/2019/03/… #ZxSpectrum

The Saints of Silicon at the Centre for Computing History have got hold of the original build of Sinclair's...

Date Published: Wed, 6 Mar 2019 22:30:23 +0200

The Saints of Silicon at the Centre for Computing History have got hold of the original build of Sinclair's ZX Spectrum - Hopes to bring silicon back to life over next few weeks

The hardware had been in the possession of Nine Tiles, a company responsible for the BASIC ROM in the ZX80 and ZX81 and called upon to provide the new BASIC for Sir Clive's new colour computer. Judging by labels on the ROM chips, the computer dates from around July 1981.

The Register had a chat with museum curator and CEO Jason Fitzpatrick, who told them the hardware had been fired up at some point in the past, and that the museum hoped to bring it back to life in the coming weeks, if the silicon cooperates.

And the value? In world where a working Apple 1 board can fetch $350,000, it's difficult to put a price on the one-off. Fitzpatrick remarked "It's in the eye of the beholder."

Yes I behold this computer with awe. The ZX81 (its predecessor) was the second computer I owned and where I really cut my teeth on programming in BASIC and hex. The ZX81's and ZX Spectrums launched many a successful computer career back then by sparking interesting in young minds.

See https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/03/05/the_first_zx_spectrum_prototype_laid_bare/ and don't miss the video at the bottom of the article

#zxspectrum #retro #vintage


The first ZX Spectrum prototype laid bare... (What? It was acceptable in the '80s) • The Register

Stephen Wolfram's (Founder of Wolfram and WolframAlpha) Productivity Hacks and Personal Infrastructure Hacks he Employs

Date Published: Wed, 6 Mar 2019 22:20:02 +0200

What a fascinating read how this really high productivity always connected CEO has organised his life around the tech he uses through decades of productivity hacks. I love the fact he mostly works remotely from home and even gives his talks from there. He "runs" his meetings whilst walking on his treadmill! And yet for some things he carries a pen and paper.

If you know anything about WolframAlpha and some of the AI technology his company has been creating for the last 32 years you'll probably want to read his story. He does not just sell a product... he created those products for himself to use, and they happen to be useful for everyone else too. I wish more CEO's were so into using their own products (although I suppose the founders always are, its what happens after the business passes onto someone else).

"At an intellectual level, the key to building this infrastructure is to structure, streamline and automate everything as much as possible—while recognizing both what’s realistic with current technology, and what fits with me personally. In many ways, it’s a good, practical exercise in computational thinking, and, yes, it’s a good application of some of the tools and ideas that I’ve spent so long building. Much of it can probably be helpful to lots of other people too; some of it is pretty specific to my personality, my situation and my patterns of activity."

"I’ve had the same big wooden desk for 25 years. And needless to say, I had it constructed with some special features. One of my theories of personal organization is that any flat surface represents a potential “stagnation point” that will tend to accumulate piles of stuff—and the best way to avoid such piles is just to avoid having permanent flat surfaces. But one inevitably needs some flat surface, if only just to sign things (it’s not all digital yet), or to eat a snack. So my solution is to have pullouts. If one needs them, pull them out. But one can’t leave them pulled out, so nothing can accumulate on them:"

"These days I don’t deal with paper much. But whenever something does come across my desk, I like to file it. So behind my desk I have an array of drawers—with the little hack that there’s a slot at the top of each drawer that allows me to immediately slide things into the drawer, without opening it."

In some ways, I do similar things but at a way more superficial level... seems I have a role model now to follow here 😉

I love that he also lists at the end of his article all the products and tech that he uses. It confirms too that that old fashioned looking phone is, in fact, an Iridium satellite phone and not a 20-year-old Nokia phone.

Read his story at blog.stephenwolfram.com/2019/0…

#productivity #wolfram blog.stephenwolfram.com/2019/0…

Stephen Wolfram's (Founder of Wolfram and WolframAlpha) Productivity Hacks and Personal Infrastructure...

Date Published: Wed, 6 Mar 2019 22:15:02 +0200

Stephen Wolfram's (Founder of Wolfram and WolframAlpha) Productivity Hacks and Personal Infrastructure Hacks he Employs

What a fascinating read how this really high productivity always connected CEO has organised his life around the tech he uses through decades of productivity hacks. I love the fact he mostly works remotely from home and even gives his talks from there. He "runs" his meetings whilst walking on his treadmill! And yet for some things he carries a pen and paper.

If you know anything about WolframAlpha and some of the AI technology his company has been creating for the last 32 years you'll probably want to read his story. He does not just sell a product... he created those products for himself to use, and they happen to be useful for everyone else too. I wish more CEO's were so into using their own products (although I suppose the founders always are, its what happens after the business passes onto someone else).

"At an intellectual level, the key to building this infrastructure is to structure, streamline and automate everything as much as possible—while recognizing both what’s realistic with current technology, and what fits with me personally. In many ways, it’s a good, practical exercise in computational thinking, and, yes, it’s a good application of some of the tools and ideas that I’ve spent so long building. Much of it can probably be helpful to lots of other people too; some of it is pretty specific to my personality, my situation and my patterns of activity."

"I’ve had the same big wooden desk for 25 years. And needless to say, I had it constructed with some special features. One of my theories of personal organization is that any flat surface represents a potential “stagnation point” that will tend to accumulate piles of stuff—and the best way to avoid such piles is just to avoid having permanent flat surfaces. But one inevitably needs some flat surface, if only just to sign things (it’s not all digital yet), or to eat a snack. So my solution is to have pullouts. If one needs them, pull them out. But one can’t leave them pulled out, so nothing can accumulate on them:"

"These days I don’t deal with paper much. But whenever something does come across my desk, I like to file it. So behind my desk I have an array of drawers—with the little hack that there’s a slot at the top of each drawer that allows me to immediately slide things into the drawer, without opening it."

In some ways, I do similar things but at a way more superficial level... seems I have a role model now to follow here ;-)

I love that he also lists at the end of his article all the products and tech that he uses. It confirms too that that old fashioned looking phone is, in fact, an Iridium satellite phone and not a 20-year-old Nokia phone.

Read his story at https://blog.stephenwolfram.com/2019/02/seeking-the-productive-life-some-details-of-my-personal-infrastructure/

#productivity #wolfram


Seeking the Productive Life: Some Details of My Personal Infrastructure—Stephen Wolfram Blog
Some of Stephen Wolfram’s “productivity hacks” to make his days and projects more productive. Daily life, desk environment, outside the office, presentation setup, filesystem organization, Wolfram Notebook systems, databases, personal analytics.

How Air Purifiers Became the Newest Wellness Craze - Air purifiers are being sold as health devices. But do they work?

Date Published: Wed, 6 Mar 2019 19:15:20 +0200

There’s growing sentiment that air purifiers are a panacea for conditions as wide ranging as bronchitis and pet allergies to masking pipe tobacco smell in a “man cave.” On the internet, air purifiers are marketed as the new CBD oil, a proposed solution for all health ills. In Facebook mom groups and Amazon customer reviews, people share their favorite makes and models, and while some occasionally gripe about defects, the overall consensus appears to be that if you or a loved one struggle with asthma or pet allergies, air purifiers can be a game-changer.

The air purifier market is experiencing an unprecedented boom — especially abroad. In South Korea, air purifier sales have tripled since 2016, with the government recently announcing a plan to install the devices in all kindergarten and pre-K classes. In China, where severe air pollution has been linked to an estimated 1.6 million preventable deaths, as many as 7.5 million devices were sold last year, up from 3.1 million in 2013.

A report from TechSci Research projected that the industry would be worth $3.9 billion by 2023, up from $2.6 billion in 2017. Air purifiers won’t just be niche medical devices for families living in high-pollution areas, but appliances as ubiquitous as the air conditioner. Some scientists believe that air purifiers are little more than a Band-Aid concealing a much larger problem. Ultimately, they don’t address the source of air pollution.

The article does not actually give a definitive answer about whether they work or not. But what is clear is we need to be cautious about the cheaper products. The ones that do work are likely to be the much more expensive HEPA filter purifiers, and also when maintained properly. Much of what we see at bargain prices are actually gimmicks. The newer PECO technology may actually be better, but the pity is we are spending money on fixing the symptoms instead of the causes of air pollution...

See onezero.medium.com/how-air-pur…

#airpollution #airpurifier onezero.medium.com/how-air-pur…

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