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HackRF One - Probably the Rolls-Royce of Software Defined Radio (SDR) - Even Transmits and is open source...

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 20:59:10 +0200

HackRF One - Probably the Rolls-Royce of Software Defined Radio (SDR) - Even Transmits and is open source hardware

HackRF One from Great Scott Gadgets is a Software Defined Radio peripheral capable of transmission or reception of radio signals from 1 MHz to 6 GHz. Designed to enable test and development of modern and next-generation radio technologies, HackRF One is an open source hardware platform that can be used as a USB peripheral or programmed for stand-alone operation.

It's main features are:
* can receive firmware updates (how many other SDR's do that?)
* 1 MHz to 6 GHz operating frequency
* half-duplex transceiver
* up to 20 million samples per second
* 8-bit quadrature samples (8-bit I and 8-bit Q)
* compatible with GNU Radio, SDR#, and more
* software-configurable RX and TX gain and baseband filter
* software-controlled antenna port power (50 mA at 3.3 V)
* SMA female antenna connector
* SMA female clock input and output for synchronization
* convenient buttons for programming
* internal pin headers for expansion
* Hi-Speed USB 2.0
* USB-powered
* open source hardware
* features various hacks by other owners

It's not cheap at around $299 but if you are really serious about SDR this device will see you into the future.

See https://greatscottgadgets.com/hackrf/

#SDR #hackrfone #openhardware


Great Scott Gadgets - HackRF One
HackRF One. an open source SDR platform. HackRF One preliminary photo. HackRF One is available from: Ada's Technical Books (US); Adafruit (US); Akizuki Denshi Tsusho (JP); Antratek Electronics (NL / BE / DE); Attify (US); BuyaPi.ca (CA); Cool Components (UK); Elektor International Media (NL) ...

This map shows the no-fly zones for drones in South Africa

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 17:24:04 +0200

This map shows the no-fly zones for drones in South Africa

Drone-flying in South Africa is governed by the South African Civil Aviation Authority which has set out regulations for remotely piloted aircraft (RPAS).

The regulations set out the requirements for flying a drone in the country, as well as the areas where you are prohibited from flying and the dangers of flying in certain zones.

THere is a useful summary of the general rules as an interactive map at https://businesstech.co.za/news/technology/302406/this-map-shows-the-no-fly-zones-for-drones-in-south-africa/. The bad news is that with the 5 airports situated around Cape Town it blankets out most of Cape Town!

#drones #southafrica


This map shows the no-fly zones for drones in South Africa
Drone-flying in South Africa is governed by the South African Civil Aviation Authority which has set out regulations for remotely piloted aircraft (RPAS).

Ubiquitilink may allow regular phones to receive two-way signals from satellites

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 17:17:40 +0200

Ubiquitilink may allow regular phones to receive two-way signals from satellites

Technically possible and many mobile phones are hardware capable. It means that it may be possible in future to be able to connect anywhere on Earth with just a plain mobile phone (and a few additional satellites of course).

The company says that most phones made in the past decade have the hardware required to connect to these satellites, but software modifications are required. This is because most phones are built around the assumption that cell towers cannot be more than 30 km (18 miles) away, since the curvature of the Earth generally prevents signals from transmitting farther than that. Once Ubiquitilink modified a phone's wireless stacks to account for the longer distance, it successfully connected to a 2G satellite in orbit.

Charles Miller, founder of Ubiquitilink, plans for the company to become a worldwide roaming operator that mobile networks will pay to access. That's a long way off, though — at least a thousand satellites are reportedly required, but the service would work with fewer in limited passes. For example, customers might not have a signal for 55 minutes, then receive service for five minutes (when the satellites pass over your location). That's certainly better than no service at all.

See https://www.androidpolice.com/2019/02/28/ubiquitilink-may-allow-regular-phones-to-receive-signals-from-satellites/

#satellites #mobilephone #Ubiquitilink


Ubiquitilink may allow regular phones to receive two-way signals from satellites
Satellite phones are typically bulky and expensive, since they require specialized hardware for sending communications into Earth orbit. However, it may be possible in the near future for regular smartphones to connect to telecommunications satellites, using technology demonstrated by Ubiquitilink Inc. During a briefing at Mobile World Congress in

How to Configure Acurite Weather Station with Weewx since Acurite ended their cloud support for many...

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 13:44:39 +0200

How to Configure Acurite Weather Station with Weewx since Acurite ended their cloud support for many models at end Feb 2019

As many Acurite weather station users know, Acurite decided to discontinue their cloud service for weather stations bought in the last two or more years effective end February 2019. So this left users like myself with Acurite 5-in-1 Weather Stations and its Smarthub no longer able to upload weather data to the Acurite cloud dashboard or Weather Underground.

But necessity is the mother of invention and maybe you will be even better off with Acurite's cloud if you use an alternative like Weewx. Weewx is an alternative free and open source weather service will either read weather data as-is via a USB link from these weather stations, or if yours is like mine without a USB connector and it only has the Smarthub, it can be configured with an alternative driver to read data from the Smarthub across your local network.

The big pluses though are:
* Numerous different skins to try out
* Installs on a basic Raspberry Pi which will also act as a web server
* Displaying to a local web server or even a remote one.
* Exporting weather data not only to Weather Underground but also to Weewx server, Automatisches Wetterkarten System (AWEKAS), Citizen Weather Observer Program (CWOP), PWSweather, British Weather Observations Website (WOW)
* Provides an RSS feed for your station
* Connects to various other weather station brands too
* Weewx is heavily customisable down to a low level if you wish, and also has 3rd party skins and extensions

WeeWX is a free, open source, software program, written in Python, which interacts with your weather station to produce graphs, reports, and HTML pages. It can optionally publish to weather sites or web servers. It uses modern software concepts, making it simple, robust, and easy to extend. It includes extensive documentation. WeeWX runs under most versions of Linux, as well as macOS, *BSD, and Solaris. Many users are running on the Raspberry Pi.

Read at https://gadgeteer.co.za/weewx how I overcame some of the challenges I faced and you can view the running weather station' s web page at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx/.

#acurite #weewx #weather #FOSS


Configuring Acurite Weather Station with Weewx | Gadgeteer
As many Acurite weather station users know, Acurite decided to discontinue their cloud service for weather stations bought in the last two or more years effective end February 2019. So this left users like myself with Acurite 5-in-1 Weather Stations and its Smarthub no longer able to upload weather data to the Acurite cloud dashboard or Weather Underground.

Configuring Acurite Weather Station with Weewx

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 12:50:08 +0200

As many Acurite weather station users know, Acurite decided to discontinue their cloud service for weather stations bought in the last two or more years effective end February 2019. So this left users like myself with Acurite 5-in-1 Weather Stations and its Smarthub no longer able to upload weather data to the Acurite cloud dashboard or Weather Underground.

But necessity is the mother of invention and maybe you will be even better off with Acurite's cloud if you use an alternative like Weewx. Weewx is an alternative free and open source weather service will either read weather data as-is via a USB link from these weather stations, or if yours is like mine without a USB connector and it only has the Smarthub, it can be configured with an alternative driver to read data from the Smarthub across your local network. The big pluses though are:

  • Numerous different skins to try out
  • Installs on a basic Raspberry Pi which will also act as a we server
  • Displaying to a local web server or even a remote one.
  • Exporting weather data not only to Weather Underground but also to Weewx server at http://weewx.com/stations.html, Automatisches Wetterkarten System (AWEKAS), Citizen Weather Observer Program (CWOP), PWSweather.com,  British Weather Observations Website (WOW)
  • Provides an RSS feed for your station
  • Connects to various other weather station brands too
  • Weewx is heavily customisable down to a low level if you wish, and also has 3rd party skins and extensions - see https://github.com/weewx/weewx/wiki

WeeWX is a free, open source, software program, written in Python, which interacts with your weather station to produce graphs, reports, and HTML pages. It can optionally publish to weather sites or web servers. It uses modern software concepts, making it simple, robust, and easy to extend. It includes extensive documentation. WeeWX runs under most versions of Linux, as well as macOS, *BSD, and Solaris. Many users are running on the Raspberry Pi.

But my two day journey to get this right was fraught with some challenges so I will briefly list what instructions I followed and what the challengers were:

Main Instructions

I followed the instructions from the Gitbub project site for Weewx-Interceptor at https://github.com/matthewwall/weewx-interceptor. This is the extra driver that reads the data from the Acurite Smarthub. I had to choose the DEB install for Weewx as I found the Python tool setup was not creating the Apache server and it was anyway creating everything as root permissions. Note if your Acurite station has a USB connection you won't need this interceptor extension.

Not capturing data from the Smarthub

The first thing here is you need to redirect the Smarthub's attempts to send its reports out to hubapi.myacurite.com and direct it to the IP address of your Raspberry Pi (or Weewx computer). I have an Asus router and followed the instructions at https://github.com/RMerl/asuswrt-merlin/wiki/Custom-domains-with-dnsmasq to use dnsmasq to achieve this. I tested it by pinging hubapi.myacurite.com and noted it now returned my Weewx computer's IP address instead.

Second thing to note is that in the Weewx.conf file you must set the IP address to listen to as the Weewx computer IP and not the Smarthub.

But still I was getting errors on starting Weewx itself like this and the app was exiting:

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: interceptor: MainThread: listen on 192.168.1.223:80

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: import of driver failed: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address (<class 'socket.error'>)

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: engine: Unable to load driver: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: **** Exiting...

The key to this in the end was that there was a clash on the listener socket so Weewx could not catch port 80 to listen on. The clash was with the Apache web browser which was already listening on port 80. So I did the following to change the web server to use port 8080 instead:

  1. Edit your port by running this command
    sudo nano /etc/apache2/ports.conf
  2. Change Listen 80 to 8000
  3. To exit nano editor, press ctrl + x then y to save
  4. Then restart apache
    sudo service apache2 restart

And it all started working. You can view my web server running off my Raspberry Pi at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx/. Note where the port 8080 comes in the address. You may also have to open the incoming port 8080 on your router and direct traffic for it to your Weewx computer's IP address. There is also an RSS feed at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx//rss.xml for my weather station.

Screenshot of my Weewx weather page
Screenshot of my Weewx weather page

 

Tags: weather, acurite, smarthub, weewx

Configuring Acurite Weather Station with Weewx

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 12:50:08 +0200

As many Acurite weather station users know, Acurite decided to discontinue their cloud service for weather stations bought in the last two or more years effective end February 2019. So this left users like myself with Acurite 5-in-1 Weather Stations and its Smarthub no longer able to upload weather data to the Acurite cloud dashboard or Weather Underground.

But necessity is the mother of invention and maybe you will be even better off with Acurite's cloud if you use an alternative like Weewx. Weewx is an alternative free and open source weather service will either read weather data as-is via a USB link from these weather stations, or if yours is like mine without a USB connector and it only has the Smarthub, it can be configured with an alternative driver to read data from the Smarthub across your local network. The big pluses though are:

  • Numerous different skins to try out
  • Installs on a basic Raspberry Pi which will also act as a we server
  • Displaying to a local web server or even a remote one.
  • Exporting weather data not only to Weather Underground but also to Weewx server at http://weewx.com/stations.html, Automatisches Wetterkarten System (AWEKAS), Citizen Weather Observer Program (CWOP), PWSweather.com,  British Weather Observations Website (WOW)
  • Provides an RSS feed for your station
  • Connects to various other weather station brands too
  • Weewx is heavily customisable down to a low level if you wish, and also has 3rd party skins and extensions - see https://github.com/weewx/weewx/wiki

WeeWX is a free, open source, software program, written in Python, which interacts with your weather station to produce graphs, reports, and HTML pages. It can optionally publish to weather sites or web servers. It uses modern software concepts, making it simple, robust, and easy to extend. It includes extensive documentation. WeeWX runs under most versions of Linux, as well as macOS, *BSD, and Solaris. Many users are running on the Raspberry Pi.

But my two day journey to get this right was fraught with some challenges so I will briefly list what instructions I followed and what the challengers were:

Main Instructions

I followed the instructions from the Gitbub project site for Weewx-Interceptor at https://github.com/matthewwall/weewx-interceptor. This is the extra driver that reads the data from the Acurite Smarthub. I had to choose the DEB install for Weewx as I found the Python tool setup was not creating the Apache server and it was anyway creating everything as root permissions. Note if your Acurite station has a USB connection you won't need this interceptor extension.

Not capturing data from the Smarthub

The first thing here is you need to redirect the Smarthub's attempts to send its reports out to hubapi.myacurite.com and direct it to the IP address of your Raspberry Pi (or Weewx computer). I have an Asus router and followed the instructions at https://github.com/RMerl/asuswrt-merlin/wiki/Custom-domains-with-dnsmasq to use dnsmasq to achieve this. I tested it by pinging hubapi.myacurite.com and noted it now returned my Weewx computer's IP address instead.

Second thing to note is that in the Weewx.conf file you must set the IP address to listen to as the Weewx computer IP and not the Smarthub.

But still I was getting errors on starting Weewx itself like this and the app was exiting:

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: interceptor: MainThread: listen on 192.168.1.223:80

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: import of driver failed: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address (<class 'socket.error'>)

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: engine: Unable to load driver: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: **** Exiting...

The key to this in the end was that there was a clash on the listener socket so Weewx could not catch port 80 to listen on. The clash was with the Apache web browser which was already listening on port 80. So I did the following to change the web server to use port 8080 instead:

  1. Edit your port by running this command
    sudo nano /etc/apache2/ports.conf
  2. Change Listen 80 to 8000
  3. To exit nano editor, press ctrl + x then y to save
  4. Then restart apache
    sudo service apache2 restart

And it all started working. You can view my web server running off my Raspberry Pi at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx/. Note where the port 8080 comes in the address. You may also have to open the incoming port 8080 on your router and direct traffic for it to your Weewx computer's IP address. There is also an RSS feed at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx//rss.xml for my weather station.

Screenshot of my Weewx weather page
Screenshot of my Weewx weather page

 

Tags: weather, acurite, smarthub, weewx

Configuring Acurite Weather Station with Weewx

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 12:50:08 +0200

As many Acurite weather station users know, Acurite decided to discontinue their cloud service for weather stations bought in the last two or more years effective end February 2019. So this left users like myself with Acurite 5-in-1 Weather Stations and its Smarthub no longer able to upload weather data to the Acurite cloud dashboard or Weather Underground.

But necessity is the mother of invention and maybe you will be even better off with Acurite's cloud if you use an alternative like Weewx. Weewx is an alternative free and open source weather service will either read weather data as-is via a USB link from these weather stations, or if yours is like mine without a USB connector and it only has the Smarthub, it can be configured with an alternative driver to read data from the Smarthub across your local network. The big pluses though are:

  • Numerous different skins to try out
  • Installs on a basic Raspberry Pi which will also act as a we server
  • Displaying to a local web server or even a remote one.
  • Exporting weather data not only to Weather Underground but also to Weewx server at http://weewx.com/stations.html, Automatisches Wetterkarten System (AWEKAS), Citizen Weather Observer Program (CWOP), PWSweather.com,  British Weather Observations Website (WOW)
  • Provides an RSS feed for your station
  • Connects to various other weather station brands too
  • Weewx is heavily customisable down to a low level if you wish, and also has 3rd party skins and extensions - see https://github.com/weewx/weewx/wiki

WeeWX is a free, open source, software program, written in Python, which interacts with your weather station to produce graphs, reports, and HTML pages. It can optionally publish to weather sites or web servers. It uses modern software concepts, making it simple, robust, and easy to extend. It includes extensive documentation. WeeWX runs under most versions of Linux, as well as macOS, *BSD, and Solaris. Many users are running on the Raspberry Pi.

But my two day journey to get this right was fraught with some challenges so I will briefly list what instructions I followed and what the challengers were:

Main Instructions

I followed the instructions from the Gitbub project site for Weewx-Interceptor at https://github.com/matthewwall/weewx-interceptor. This is the extra driver that reads the data from the Acurite Smarthub. I had to choose the DEB install for Weewx as I found the Python tool setup was not creating the Apache server and it was anyway creating everything as root permissions. Note if your Acurite station has a USB connection you won't need this interceptor extension.

Not capturing data from the Smarthub

The first thing here is you need to redirect the Smarthub's attempts to send its reports out to hubapi.myacurite.com and direct it to the IP address of your Raspberry Pi (or Weewx computer). I have an Asus router and followed the instructions at https://github.com/RMerl/asuswrt-merlin/wiki/Custom-domains-with-dnsmasq to use dnsmasq to achieve this. I tested it by pinging hubapi.myacurite.com and noted it now returned my Weewx computer's IP address instead.

Second thing to note is that in the Weewx.conf file you must set the IP address to listen to as the Weewx computer IP and not the Smarthub.

But still I was getting errors on starting Weewx itself like this and the app was exiting:

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: interceptor: MainThread: listen on 192.168.1.223:80

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: import of driver failed: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address (<class 'socket.error'>)

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: engine: Unable to load driver: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: **** Exiting...

The key to this in the end was that there was a clash on the listener socket so Weewx could not catch port 80 to listen on. The clash was with the Apache web browser which was already listening on port 80. So I did the following to change the web server to use port 8080 instead:

  1. Edit your port by running this command
    sudo nano /etc/apache2/ports.conf
  2. Change Listen 80 to 8000
  3. To exit nano editor, press ctrl + x then y to save
  4. Then restart apache
    sudo service apache2 restart

And it all started working. You can view my web server running off my Raspberry Pi at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx/. Note where the port 8080 comes in the address. You may also have to open the incoming port 8080 on your router and direct traffic for it to your Weewx computer's IP address. There is also an RSS feed at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx//rss.xml for my weather station.

Screenshot of my Weewx weather page
Screenshot of my Weewx weather page

 

Tags: weather, acurite, smarthub, weewx

Configuring Acurite Weather Station with Weewx

Date Published: Sun, 3 Mar 2019 12:50:08 +0200

As many Acurite weather station users know, Acurite decided to discontinue their cloud service for weather stations bought in the last two or more years effective end February 2019. So this left users like myself with Acurite 5-in-1 Weather Stations and its Smarthub no longer able to upload weather data to the Acurite cloud dashboard or Weather Underground.

But necessity is the mother of invention and maybe you will be even better off with Acurite's cloud if you use an alternative like Weewx. Weewx is an alternative free and open source weather service will either read weather data as-is via a USB link from these weather stations, or if yours is like mine without a USB connector and it only has the Smarthub, it can be configured with an alternative driver to read data from the Smarthub across your local network. The big pluses though are:

  • Numerous different skins to try out
  • Installs on a basic Raspberry Pi which will also act as a we server
  • Displaying to a local web server or even a remote one.
  • Exporting weather data not only to Weather Underground but also to Weewx server at http://weewx.com/stations.html, Automatisches Wetterkarten System (AWEKAS), Citizen Weather Observer Program (CWOP), PWSweather.com,  British Weather Observations Website (WOW)
  • Provides an RSS feed for your station
  • Connects to various other weather station brands too
  • Weewx is heavily customisable down to a low level if you wish, and also has 3rd party skins and extensions - see https://github.com/weewx/weewx/wiki

WeeWX is a free, open source, software program, written in Python, which interacts with your weather station to produce graphs, reports, and HTML pages. It can optionally publish to weather sites or web servers. It uses modern software concepts, making it simple, robust, and easy to extend. It includes extensive documentation. WeeWX runs under most versions of Linux, as well as macOS, *BSD, and Solaris. Many users are running on the Raspberry Pi.

But my two day journey to get this right was fraught with some challenges so I will briefly list what instructions I followed and what the challengers were:

Main Instructions

I followed the instructions from the Gitbub project site for Weewx-Interceptor at https://github.com/matthewwall/weewx-interceptor. This is the extra driver that reads the data from the Acurite Smarthub. I had to choose the DEB install for Weewx as I found the Python tool setup was not creating the Apache server and it was anyway creating everything as root permissions. Note if your Acurite station has a USB connection you won't need this interceptor extension.

Not capturing data from the Smarthub

The first thing here is you need to redirect the Smarthub's attempts to send its reports out to hubapi.myacurite.com and direct it to the IP address of your Raspberry Pi (or Weewx computer). I have an Asus router and followed the instructions at https://github.com/RMerl/asuswrt-merlin/wiki/Custom-domains-with-dnsmasq to use dnsmasq to achieve this. I tested it by pinging hubapi.myacurite.com and noted it now returned my Weewx computer's IP address instead.

Second thing to note is that in the Weewx.conf file you must set the IP address to listen to as the Weewx computer IP and not the Smarthub.

But still I was getting errors on starting Weewx itself like this and the app was exiting:

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: interceptor: MainThread: listen on 192.168.1.223:80

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: import of driver failed: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address (<class 'socket.error'>)

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: engine: Unable to load driver: [Errno 99] Cannot assign requested address

Mar 2 10:10:52 raspberrypi weewx[1211]: **** Exiting...

The key to this in the end was that there was a clash on the listener socket so Weewx could not catch port 80 to listen on. The clash was with the Apache web browser which was already listening on port 80. So I did the following to change the web server to use port 8080 instead:

  1. Edit your port by running this command
    sudo nano /etc/apache2/ports.conf
  2. Change Listen 80 to 8000
  3. To exit nano editor, press ctrl + x then y to save
  4. Then restart apache
    sudo service apache2 restart

And it all started working. You can view my web server running off my Raspberry Pi at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx/. Note where the port 8080 comes in the address. You may also have to open the incoming port 8080 on your router and direct traffic for it to your Weewx computer's IP address. There is also an RSS feed at http://dvdmerwe.asuscomm.com:8080/weewx//rss.xml for my weather station.

Screenshot of my Weewx weather page
Screenshot of my Weewx weather page

 

Tags: weather, acurite, smarthub, weewx

MFJ-993B Intellituner Automatic Antenna Tuner arrived this week

Date Published: Sat, 2 Mar 2019 14:18:41 +0200

MFJ-993B Intellituner Automatic Antenna Tuner arrived this week

Too much reflective power coming back from a badly tuned antenna can not only in extreme cases cause damage to a transmitter but it is also an indicator of bad resonance which means power loss from the actual transmission.

This auto tuner cannot correct for actual resonance of the antenna (you have to, for example, adjust the antenna itself) but it does improve power transfer between the transmitter and the antenna by matching the specified load impedance of the radio to the combined input impedance of the feedline (the feedline is the coax cable between the transmitter and the antenna).

The device will also the SWR (amount of reflective power as a ratio), the power output in Watts from the transmitter, the frequency in MHz, and it has an L-Network display too showing inductance value and the capacitance value both on the antenna and the transmitter side.

The tuner operates on the HF band between 1.8 MHz and 30 MHz and will handle output power up to 300 Watts. Two other nice features are it can switch between two different antennas, and it has a built-in 4:1 balun which allows a balanced line antenna to be directly connected to it without the need to buy a balun. I also have a connector directly to the radio which allows tuning to be done from the radio itself to the auto tuner.

#MFJ993B #autotuner #amateurradio


Two South African Internet connectivity projects - Project Isizwe and Zenzeleni - have made it into ...

Date Published: Thu, 28 Feb 2019 20:43:53 +0200

Two South African Internet connectivity projects - Project Isizwe and Zenzeleni - have made it into the semi-finals of Mozilla's $250 000 Equal Rating Innovation Challenge - A Competition to bridge the digital divide across the world

From SA, Cape Town-based Afri-Fi: Free Public WiFi and Zenzeleni Networks, also from Cape Town, have made it into the semi-finals made up of five teams. Furthermore, Steve Song, a South African who is now living in Canada, is among the final five.

What impresses me about the projects is not so much the technology (mesh-networking itself is not new) but rather what they did to make it work, and even more difficult, to actually get it integrated and used within a community. Such connectivity not only helps spread information and education within the community but even more importantly aids with crucial communications during disasters or other emergencies.

See https://www.itweb.co.za/content/nG98Yd7LYRQMX2PD

#southafrica #innovation


Project Isizwe, Zenzeleni make Mozilla's final five | ITWeb
The local Internet connectivity projects have been recognised globally for their innovative ideas to narrow the digital gap.
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