Why “digital detoxes” are nonsense - Most studies rely on self-reported estimates of technology use,...

Why “digital detoxes” are nonsense - Most studies rely on self-reported estimates of technology use, which often don’t reflect reality

People have always been concerned about almost every mass-adopted technology invented, and social media and smartphones are no different. But the idea that screen-based technologies are harming society continues to be a source of considerable debate surrounded by questionable evidence and media hype. As more research is completed, it’s important that findings are presented carefully to prevent further misinterpretation and fear-mongering.

Giving up technology also means giving up the good things about it. For example, smartphones and social media help people communicate and socialise, which is known to increase happiness. So it’s not surprising that some studies have found complete withdrawal from social media can have adverse consequences such as lower satisfaction, boredom, feelings of social pressure, and fear.

When it comes to digital detoxes, there is unlikely to be anything seriously wrong with stepping away from technology for the majority of people. But the notion that they’re a “good idea”, or that they have any lasting effects, is yet to be supported by science. In fact, seeing as there’s little evidence to suggest that technology is inherently bad, it might be that digital detoxes have no problem to solve in the first place.

See https://mybroadband.co.za/news/gadgets/292818-why-digital-detoxes-are-nonsense.html

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Why “digital detoxes” are nonsense
Frequent use of technology and social media isn’t a problem in itself, despite reported claims.

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