Battery breakthroughs are now happening: University of Michigan development could double performance...

Battery breakthroughs are now happening: University of Michigan development could double performance with lithium metal that doesn't catch fire

A rechargeable battery technology developed at the University of Michigan could double the output of today's lithium-ion cells - -drastically extending electric vehicle ranges and time between cell phone charges - -without taking up any added space.

By using a ceramic, solid-state electrolyte, engineers can harness the power of lithium metal batteries without the historic issues of poor durability and short-circuiting. The result is a roadmap to what could be the next generation of rechargeable batteries.

"This could be a game-changer--a paradigm shift in how a battery operates," said Jeff Sakamoto, a U-M associate professor of mechanical engineering who leads the work.

To solve lithium metal's combustion problem, U-M engineers created a ceramic layer that stabilizes the surface--keeping dendrites from forming and preventing fires. It allows batteries to harness the benefits of lithium metal--energy density and high-conductivity--without the dangers of fires or degradation over time.

"We're talking a factor of 10 increase in charging speed compared to previous reports for solid state lithium metal batteries. We're now on par with lithium-ion cells in terms of charging rates, but with additional benefits. "

The group's findings are published in the Aug. 31 issue of the Journal of Power Sources.

See https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-08/uom-bbd081518.php

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Battery breakthrough: Doubling performance with lithium metal that doesn't catch fire
A rechargeable battery technology developed at the University of Michigan could double the output of today's lithium ion cells -- drastically extending electric vehicle ranges and time between cell phone charges -- without taking up any added space.

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