Why the UK’s CO2 emissions have fallen 38% since 1990 - Mostly due to cleaner energy mix, followed by...

Why the UK’s CO2 emissions have fallen 38% since 1990 - Mostly due to cleaner energy mix, followed by reduced fuel consumption by business and industry

The UK’s CO2 emissions peaked in the year 1973 and have declined by around 38% since 1990, faster than any other major developed country.

Here, Carbon Brief presents detailed analysis of the reasons behind the decline in UK CO2 since 1990. The most significant factors include a cleaner electricity mix based on gas and renewables instead of coal, as well as falling demand for energy across homes, businesses and industry.

Emissions would have been twice as large today if underlying factors had not changed. Electricity-sector emissions would have been nearly four times higher.

Transport was responsible for around 34% of the UK’s CO2 emissions in 2017. This share has increased from 21% in 1990 as other sectors of the economy have cut their emissions while transport CO2 output has barely changed.

This sector includes cars and taxis, heavy goods vehicles, vans, buses and coaches, motorcycles and mopeds, rail transport, domestic aviation and shipping and other mobile emission sources. It does not include the UK’s share of international aviation and shipping, as discussed below.

Transport is a particularly challenging sector for emission reductions, as cost-effective electric alternatives to petrol and diesel vehicles are only beginning to emerge.

More interesting analysis at https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis-why-the-uks-co2-emissions-have-fallen-38-since-1990

#CO2 #UK #emissions


Analysis: Why the UK’s CO2 emissions have fallen 38% since 1990 | Carbon Brief
The UK’s CO2 emissions peaked in the year 1973 and have declined by around 38% since 1990, faster than any other major developed country.

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